Category: Medical Research

How to lose weight quickly: a joint study of medical experts and health researchers

When summer comes, many people suddenly realize that they have grown fat over the winter and that they need to lose weight urgently. The Internet is overwhelmed with various recipes about how to lose weight quickly. Many of these methods are very exotic, but all promise quick results. Martin Cornell, an inspector of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, decided to try out some of these methods and determine which one is the most effective.

Opinion: Despite good intentions, women not achieving good health

By Sarah Mapes Over many decades and centuries, many things have changed about American families. One thing that hasnt is that when it comes to health and health care, women are in the drivers seat. In two-thirds of American households, women are the primary health care decision-makers. We are more likely to choose our familys health insurance plan. We ensure that our children get vaccines and regular check-ups, that our husbands take their heart pills and that our aging parents get appropriate long term care. We account for 80 cents of every dollar spent at drugstores and do most of the scheduling of medical…

Useless, costly medical procedures targeted by Choosing Wisely campaign

By Diane Carman Just say no. Thats what the Colorado Medical Society and a growing number of other health care organizations nationwide want patients to start doing. No to useless antibiotics. No to unnecessary scans. No to diagnostic tests at too-frequent intervals. The list goes on and on. Its a baby step toward sanity in a health care system that some say has become an irrational market of questionable procedures, exorbitant costs and mediocre outcomes. About one-third of the interventions we do are really unnecessary, said Dr. Jan Kief, who just finished her term as president of the Colorado Medical Society. That costs…

Useless, costly medical procedures targeted by Choosing Wisely campaign

By Diane Carman Just say no. Thats what the Colorado Medical Society and a growing number of other health care organizations nationwide want patients to start doing. No to useless antibiotics. No to unnecessary scans. No to diagnostic tests at too-frequent intervals. The list goes on and on. Its a baby step toward sanity in a health care system that some say has become an irrational market of questionable procedures, exorbitant costs and mediocre outcomes. About one-third of the interventions we do are really unnecessary, said Dr. Jan Kief, who just finished her term as president of the Colorado Medical Society. That costs…

‘My dear Watson’ — from ‘Jeopardy’ to a doc’s office near you

By Katie Kerwin McCrimmon KEYSTONE Best known for beating brilliant humans at Jeopardy, Watson, the super computer, soon may be coming to a hospital or insurance company near you. But dont call him (or her) Dr. Watson. The more appropriate reference may be to Sherlock Holmes my dear Watson, the indispensable right-hand man or woman as Lucy Liu now portrays Dr. Joan Watson in the re-imagined TV show, Elementary. IBMs Watson is actually named to honor the companys founder, Thomas J. Watson. But as Watsons creators dream up future roles for their intelligent machine medical sleuth, patient watchdog and reading…

Obesity a disease, cure elusive

By Katie Kerwin McCrimmon To call it a disease or not? That is the question. Since leaders of the American Medical Association last week trumped advice from their own committee of experts and declared obesity a disease, speculation has been rife. Will this be a game-changing decision? Or has the tree fallen in the forest and no one cares? Will insurers now pay for obesity care and prevention? Will people carting around extra pounds be convinced to take meds just like those with high blood pressure? Will doctors start talking about obesity with those of us who are elephants in…

Opinion: Colorado economy depends on drug innovation

By April Giles Gov. John Hickenlooper recently highlighted the vital work of Colorados biopharmaceutical industry. Weve had over 3,000 clinical trials of new medicines since 1999, he said. They allow health care providers new opportunities to predict, pre-empt and prevent illness. It was a timely reminder. Our state hosts more than 600 bioscience firms and employs over 122,000 Coloradoans in direct and indirect jobs. A new report by the Analysis Group titled Innovation in the Biopharmaceutical Pipeline: A Multidimensional View shows that thousands of promising new drugs are in development, but we need to ensure that these promising innovations arent…

‘Breakthrough’ drugs speed path to cures and the NBA

By Katie Kerwin McCrimmon Hovering at just over 4 feet 5 inches, the Broomfield second-grader is a smidge short for the NBA. But thats not stopping Caleb Nolan from planning his career as a basketball star and neither is his cystic fibrosis (CF). Diagnosed at birth with the rare disease, Caleb receives regular care at Childrens Hospital Colorado and happily plays basketball, soccer, baseball and football. Aside from licking salt on the sidelines to thwart dehydration, hes like any of the other boys on his team. And thanks to a new medication called Kalydeco that has been fast-tracked to market,…

NFL retirees submit to tests to identify fatal brain disease

By Diane Carman It was at the funeral of former teammate Lee Roy Selmon that Dave Stalls confronted his own mortality. Selmon, who played alongside Stalls on the defensive line of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the 1980s, died of a massive stroke on Sept. 4, 2011. He was 56, the same age as Stalls. As Stalls looked around at the mourners at the service, something struck him. None of the other members of that Tampa Bay starting defensive line was there. Many of them including the defensive line coach were dead. It gets really personal, said Stalls. Dave Stalls…

Hidden gun injuries ‘routine’ among children

By Katie Kerwin McCrimmon The horror of 20 children being shot to death at Sandy Hook Elementary School shocked the nation and the world. But Colorado researchers who initially set out to study playground accidents found that gun violence is harming children every day. Very few people know about these gun injuries because f ederal law has prohibited funding for research on gun accidents and fatalities. The Colorado researchers combed through every single injury over an eight-year period at Denvers two primary trauma hospitals that serve children, Denver Health and Childrens Hospital Colorado . They expected to find information about playground injuries and were surprised to learn that violence was harming a significant number of children every…